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Mothers travel to US-Mexico border to gain perspective on migrant caravan

Photo: KGBT

RIO GRANDE VALLEY, Texas (KGBT) - Moms from across America made their way down to the southern border to experience firsthand and get a mom’s eye view on where the migrant caravan might stop.

Mothers came from across the country from Nevada, New York, Chicago and Washington D.C in a decision to caravan themselves to the U.S.- Mexico border in South Texas.

“I’m here as a Texas mom and actually I am encouraged, moms from across the country come and join us to stand together,” said Alice Linahan, a mother from Dallas.

Many of them shocked to find out what separates both countries.

“To see this wall I mean we heard about it and talked about it and the Rio Grande and I can’t believe it—that is what is separating—that is not securing our border at all,” said Stephanie Trussell, a mom from Chicago.

And seeing firsthand an apprehension of two undocumented immigrants from El Salvador.

Beth Parlato from Buffalo, New York said it was a scene that she had not experienced before and called the experience “surreal.”

With the migrant caravan on its way to the border, these moms heard from local educators living in the Rio Grande Valley.

Parlato said she wanted to see how close the schools were to the borders and get a mother's perspective.

“Hopefully on Tuesday the American people will vote to send people back to D.C. to help him [President Donald Trump] get this agenda passed and get this wall built everywhere around and then we would love to help whoever,” Trussell said.

But residents living on the border disagree and say immigrants are not a threat, and especially the migrants traveling in this caravan.

A study done by the Cato Institute shows that immigrants commit less crime than American citizens.

"The asylum seekers want come here to make a better life for themselves and their kids, through the work of the Angry Tias and Abuelas, we have been able to get to know some of these people one-on-one we spent time with them we spent time with them talking at the bus stations," said Nayelly Narrios of the Angry Tias and Abuelas an organization that works to help asylum seekers on their journey.

As these moms continue to explore the southern border, some are torn as they agree immigration is a complicated issue.

“It’s emotional, you have them crossing the border, you know they are just trying to find a better way of life a better jobs that is what they are trying to do so it is emotional—we just wish we had a better answer,” said Parlatto.

After a day visiting the border wall, schools here at the border and even the ports of entry, these mothers say that it is more important to fund the border wall.

They will be heading back to their home states tomorrow.

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