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10 years after Virginia Tech Massacre, what's changed?

(Photo: Virginia Tech)

BLACKSBURG, Va. (WSET) -- 10 years after April 16, 2007 there are several new security measures to keep the Virginia Tech campus and campuses across the country safe.

The Virginia Tech police chief says he's seen crimes be avoided because of intervention by professionals and the school is continuing to train themselves and the community to stay safe.

Virginia Tech Police chief Kevin Foust saw the tragedy on April 16 while serving as an FBI agent.

Then after serving at Virginia Tech, he saw the healing.

SPECIAL SECTION | WE REMEMBER VT

"The way this community became a real true Hokie nation made such an impression on me that when I can retire from my federal service this is where I want to be," Foust said.

Foust started in 2011 and is continuing to keep the campus safe.

He says some things that are easy to see are more security cameras, doubling the size of the police force, and faster emergency notifications, something seen happening around the country.

"The biggest societial change is that you have campus communities that expect immediate notification where there is potential threat to their safety," Foust said.

"After April 16, 2007, issuing warnings within minutes rather than hours became the norm," said Campus Safety Advocate, S. Daniel Carter.

In addition to the physical changes, Chief Foust said another change works to prevent crimes before they even happen.

The Threat Assessment Team is made up of several offices across the campus to help people who are struggling.

"But, I have seen personally where the team has dealt with people who are in deep crisis and they were able to bring the resources necessary to get them back to being productive folks," Foust said.

And, in the event of another tragedy, the campus is more prepared and students are trained on a variety of drills including active shooter situations.

"So, it's getting out there with all incoming freshman into the student body and eventually it will become a normal way of coming to Virginia Tech and having this type of training," he said.

Chief Foust said Virginia Tech is on the cutting edge of campus security as they routinely get calls from other colleges about how they keep their school safe.

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